17 Dec 2013, 8:02pm
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Midday Traffic in San Diego Collapsed and Reorganized by Color



In this new video art clip from San Diego-based filmmaker Cy Kuckenbaker, we watch as a 4-minute shot from the Washington Street bridge in San Diego is deftly edited, sorted, and compressed resulting in perfectly color-coded traffic. Kuckenbaker notes:

The source footage for this video is a 4-minute shot from the Washington Street bridge above State Route 163 in San Diego captured at 2:39pm Oct 1, 2013. My aim is to reveal the color palette and color preferences of contemporary San Diego drivers in addition to traffic patterns and volumes. There are no CG elements, these are all real cars that have been removed from one sample and reorganized.

The filmmaker wowed us at about this time last year when he condensed five hours of plane landings into 30 seconds. (via Stellar)

Midday Traffic in San Diego Collapsed and Reorganized by Color | Colossal.

Set Design: Portraits made from household objects from Blommers / Schumm

Midas-touch Dutch duo Blommers / Schumm have been making the world look cooler for years. Their brilliant photoshoots and set design for the trendiest magazines are so consistently excellent that we barely even have to look at one of their projects before we whack it on It’s Nice That. This one, though, is by far my favourite. For a show in Amsterdam the duo paired up with Erwin Olaf and Petra Stavast to create Renaissance portraits out of household objects. So simple but meticulously done. Watch a making-of animation on their site to see the projects in their full glory.

via Its Nice That : Set Design: Portraits made from household objects from Blommers / Schumm.

19 Oct 2013, 9:57am
curation photography
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Marina Abramović Made Me Cry


Photographs by Marco Anelli. From the book:PORTRAITS IN THE PRESENCE OF MARINA ABRAMOVIC (Marco Anelli © 2010) http://www.marcoanelli.com/portraitsbook_e.html

Portraits taken during the MoMA’s exhibit of performance artist “Marina Abramović: The Artist Is Present”. Abramović sits at a table in silence, and museum guests can sit across from her and stare.

Some people couldn’t handle the heat.

Tumblr by: Katie Notopoulos 

Marina Abramović Made Me Cry.

Luke Evans & Josh Lake: I am a camera

We’ve seen some odd student projects in our time here at CR, but this must go down as one of the oddest: two Kingston students created human photograms by swallowing 35mm film, then, erm, expelling it, and recording the results

Luke Evans (above) and and Josh Lake (below) are in the final first year of the BA Graphic Design & Photography at Kingston University. For their final major project they “wanted to bring our insides out” they say. “So we ate 35mm photographic film slides and let our bodies do the rest.”

Both students ate pieces of 35mm slide film, ‘expelled’ it in the dark, fixed the silver and then scanned the pieces using an electron microscope in order to record the traces their bodies had left on the film’s surface.

“The full-sized images are 10,000 pixels on the longest edge, allowing you to see every detail of what our bodies produced,” they say, as can be seen from this shot of the work on show.

See more of Luke Evans’ work here

And Josh Lake’s here


Creative Review – I am a camera.

Descriptive Camera – Matt Richardson

Matt Richardson created a camera which doesn’t deliver a photo but a description of the photo it made. Eh what? After the shutter button is pressed, the Descriptive Camera sends the photo to Amazons Mechanical Turk for processing. Somewhere someone receives this photo and writes a short description about what’s on the photo, that person receives a small payment for this task. As soon as that text comes back, a thermal printer outputs the result in the style of a polaroid print.

How cool is that!

via Descriptive Camera – today and tomorrow.

13 Feb 2012, 10:19am
curation Wabi Sabi
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“My Favorite Museum Exhibit”: Butterflies eating a piranha

This is not a spot of whimsy, people. This kind of thing really does happen. In fact, you can watch a real-life example (with a less-threatening fish substituted in for the piranha) in a video taken in Alabama’s Bankhead National Forest.

The good news: The butterflies are not really carnivorous, per se. The bad news: What they’re actually doing is still pretty damn creepy.

It’s called “puddling” or “mud-puddling”. The basic idea works like this: Butterflies get most of their diet in the form of nectar. They’re pollinators. But nectar doesn’t have all the nutrients and minerals butterflies need to survive, so they have to dip their probosces into some other food sources, as well. Depending on the species of butterfly, those other sources can include: Mineral-rich water in a shallow mud puddle, animal poop, and (yes) carrion.

When butterflies puddle over a dead fish, though, they aren’t biting off chunks. Instead, they’re essentially licking the dead fish—going after salt and minerals that seep out of the dead animal as it decomposes. Bonus: Some butterflies also like to lick the sweat off of humans. And a few species of moth have been documented sucking blood and tears for living animals, including humans.

“My Favorite Museum Exhibit”: Butterflies eating a piranha – Boing Boing.

11 Feb 2012, 2:09pm
books curation Reading
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Shelf-Conscious, an article by Francesca Mari


Chris Killip, ‘The Library of Chained Books,’ Hereford Cathedral, Hereford, UK, 1992.

In the Middle Ages, when monasteries were the closest equivalent to a public library, monks kept works in their carrels. To increase circulation, these works were eventually chained to inclined desks, or lecterns, thus giving ownership of a work to a particular lectern rather than a particular monk. But as collections grew, surface space diminished, and books came to be stacked on shelves above the lectern, at first one and then many. The problem, of course, was that two books chained next to each another couldn’t be comfortably studied at the same time: elbows knocked; shackles clinked and tangled.

A selection from Odorico Pillone’s library with fore edges painted by Cesare Vecellio.

Hence the innovation of vertical storage. One book could be removed without disturbing the rest. Yet the transition was gradual. Books in monasteries retained their chains for some time, and many leather covers, particularly in private libraries, protruded irregularly, tricked-out as they were with embossing and jewels. Those books that did stand were oriented with their spines to the back of the shelf.

Sometimes an identifying design was drawn across the thick of the pages. A doctor of law just north of Venice named Odorico Pillone had Titian’s nephew, Cesare Vecellio, draw the fore edges of his books with scenes befitting their content. Other times a title label flagged off the inner edge of the cover or was affixed to the chain.

From The New York Times Shows You 65 Ways to Decorate with Books in Your Home, photographer unknown.

All text by Francesca Mari,

read all about it here: Paris Review – Shelf-Conscious, Francesca Mari.