Portfolio

9 May 2018, 12:21pm
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The Clock, Christian Marclay

A major work by New York–based artist Christian Marclay, The Clock mines the history of film for moments from everyday life and thrilling only-in-the-movies events that indicate the passage of time. Synchronized with local time, cinematic and actual time run parallel in a 24-hour montage.

17 Dec 2013, 8:02pm
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Midday Traffic in San Diego Collapsed and Reorganized by Color

 

 

In this new video art clip from San Diego-based filmmaker Cy Kuckenbaker, we watch as a 4-minute shot from the Washington Street bridge in San Diego is deftly edited, sorted, and compressed resulting in perfectly color-coded traffic. Kuckenbaker notes:

The source footage for this video is a 4-minute shot from the Washington Street bridge above State Route 163 in San Diego captured at 2:39pm Oct 1, 2013. My aim is to reveal the color palette and color preferences of contemporary San Diego drivers in addition to traffic patterns and volumes. There are no CG elements, these are all real cars that have been removed from one sample and reorganized.

The filmmaker wowed us at about this time last year when he condensed five hours of plane landings into 30 seconds. (via Stellar)

Midday Traffic in San Diego Collapsed and Reorganized by Color | Colossal.

Set Design: Portraits made from household objects from Blommers / Schumm

Midas-touch Dutch duo Blommers / Schumm have been making the world look cooler for years. Their brilliant photoshoots and set design for the trendiest magazines are so consistently excellent that we barely even have to look at one of their projects before we whack it on It’s Nice That. This one, though, is by far my favourite. For a show in Amsterdam the duo paired up with Erwin Olaf and Petra Stavast to create Renaissance portraits out of household objects. So simple but meticulously done. Watch a making-of animation on their site to see the projects in their full glory.

via Its Nice That : Set Design: Portraits made from household objects from Blommers / Schumm.

19 Oct 2013, 9:57am
curation photography
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Marina Abramović Made Me Cry

 

Photographs by Marco Anelli. From the book:PORTRAITS IN THE PRESENCE OF MARINA ABRAMOVIC (Marco Anelli © 2010) http://www.marcoanelli.com/portraitsbook_e.html

Portraits taken during the MoMA’s exhibit of performance artist “Marina Abramović: The Artist Is Present”. Abramović sits at a table in silence, and museum guests can sit across from her and stare.

Some people couldn’t handle the heat.

Tumblr by: Katie Notopoulos 

Marina Abramović Made Me Cry.

Luke Evans & Josh Lake: I am a camera

We’ve seen some odd student projects in our time here at CR, but this must go down as one of the oddest: two Kingston students created human photograms by swallowing 35mm film, then, erm, expelling it, and recording the results

Luke Evans (above) and and Josh Lake (below) are in the final first year of the BA Graphic Design & Photography at Kingston University. For their final major project they “wanted to bring our insides out” they say. “So we ate 35mm photographic film slides and let our bodies do the rest.”

Both students ate pieces of 35mm slide film, ‘expelled’ it in the dark, fixed the silver and then scanned the pieces using an electron microscope in order to record the traces their bodies had left on the film’s surface.

“The full-sized images are 10,000 pixels on the longest edge, allowing you to see every detail of what our bodies produced,” they say, as can be seen from this shot of the work on show.

See more of Luke Evans’ work here

And Josh Lake’s here

 

Creative Review – I am a camera.

Descriptive Camera – Matt Richardson

Matt Richardson created a camera which doesn’t deliver a photo but a description of the photo it made. Eh what? After the shutter button is pressed, the Descriptive Camera sends the photo to Amazons Mechanical Turk for processing. Somewhere someone receives this photo and writes a short description about what’s on the photo, that person receives a small payment for this task. As soon as that text comes back, a thermal printer outputs the result in the style of a polaroid print.

How cool is that!

via Descriptive Camera – today and tomorrow.

13 Feb 2012, 10:19am
curation Wabi Sabi
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“My Favorite Museum Exhibit”: Butterflies eating a piranha

This is not a spot of whimsy, people. This kind of thing really does happen. In fact, you can watch a real-life example (with a less-threatening fish substituted in for the piranha) in a video taken in Alabama’s Bankhead National Forest.

The good news: The butterflies are not really carnivorous, per se. The bad news: What they’re actually doing is still pretty damn creepy.

It’s called “puddling” or “mud-puddling”. The basic idea works like this: Butterflies get most of their diet in the form of nectar. They’re pollinators. But nectar doesn’t have all the nutrients and minerals butterflies need to survive, so they have to dip their probosces into some other food sources, as well. Depending on the species of butterfly, those other sources can include: Mineral-rich water in a shallow mud puddle, animal poop, and (yes) carrion.

When butterflies puddle over a dead fish, though, they aren’t biting off chunks. Instead, they’re essentially licking the dead fish—going after salt and minerals that seep out of the dead animal as it decomposes. Bonus: Some butterflies also like to lick the sweat off of humans. And a few species of moth have been documented sucking blood and tears for living animals, including humans.

“My Favorite Museum Exhibit”: Butterflies eating a piranha – Boing Boing.

11 Feb 2012, 2:09pm
books curation Reading
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Shelf-Conscious, an article by Francesca Mari

 

Chris Killip, ‘The Library of Chained Books,’ Hereford Cathedral, Hereford, UK, 1992.

In the Middle Ages, when monasteries were the closest equivalent to a public library, monks kept works in their carrels. To increase circulation, these works were eventually chained to inclined desks, or lecterns, thus giving ownership of a work to a particular lectern rather than a particular monk. But as collections grew, surface space diminished, and books came to be stacked on shelves above the lectern, at first one and then many. The problem, of course, was that two books chained next to each another couldn’t be comfortably studied at the same time: elbows knocked; shackles clinked and tangled.

A selection from Odorico Pillone’s library with fore edges painted by Cesare Vecellio.

Hence the innovation of vertical storage. One book could be removed without disturbing the rest. Yet the transition was gradual. Books in monasteries retained their chains for some time, and many leather covers, particularly in private libraries, protruded irregularly, tricked-out as they were with embossing and jewels. Those books that did stand were oriented with their spines to the back of the shelf.

Sometimes an identifying design was drawn across the thick of the pages. A doctor of law just north of Venice named Odorico Pillone had Titian’s nephew, Cesare Vecellio, draw the fore edges of his books with scenes befitting their content. Other times a title label flagged off the inner edge of the cover or was affixed to the chain.

From The New York Times Shows You 65 Ways to Decorate with Books in Your Home, photographer unknown.

All text by Francesca Mari,

read all about it here: Paris Review – Shelf-Conscious, Francesca Mari.

Thomas Forsyth: Drawing tops

Drawing Tops
A spinning-top, that uses a pen as the spindle, represents many of the core ideas behind my current work. It is recognisable, un-intimidating, and invites people to interact with objects that can lead to unpredictable results, or an emergent property. Simply through indulging in the enjoyable process of spinning the top a bi-product is created. Where the pen marks the surface, a beautiful map of the experience and events that have occurred is produced. I am able to draw, but I am not particularly talented at it and yet found that, through the interaction with these objects, I have created drawings that I am more proud of than any I have done before.

Why not have a go…

His Drawing Tops are now available to buy at:
www.folksy.com (UK)
www.etsy.com (UK & Worldwide)
Art-s-talker

25 Jan 2012, 4:03pm
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Yes, More To Do Lists

 

 

 

 

Yes, More To Do Lists

I thought these were lost forever. Imagine my joy at finding them sandwiched in between the pages of some soon-to-be-thrown-out magazine. These are my brother and his partner’s to do lists. If you’ve been here for awhile, you may have seen the earlier iterations here, here and here. He has been feeding them to me over the past year or so. I gasp every time I look at them.

via Mrs. Easton » Blog Archive » Yes, More To Do Lists.

Light Stencils Commemorate Victims of the 2011 Christchurch Earthquake | Colossal

 

 

The 2011 Christchurch earthquake was the largest natural disaster in New Zealand’s history, claiming the lives of 181 people and leaving behind nearly $30 billion in rebuilding costs. Touched by the events of that February day, photographer Fabrice Wittner set out to confront the destruction the best way he knew how: by making art. His Enlightened Souls project utilizes large, human-sized stencils that are painted with light during long exposures, creating thin portraits that appear almost like holograms. Many more images and process shots can be seen here. Images courtesy the artist. (via behance)

Light Stencils Commemorate Victims of the 2011 Christchurch Earthquake | Colossal.

African-American quilts

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Quilts – BOOOOOOOM! – CREATE * INSPIRE * COMMUNITY * ART * DESIGN * MUSIC * FILM * PHOTO * PROJECTS.

Aleksandra Domanović: 19:30 Stacks

 

 

 

 

 

 

19:30 Stacks is a new series of sculptures by Aleksandra Domanović. They’re actually stacks of A4 and A3 paper with parts of photos printed on their side. To create this effect, Aleksandra made huge PDF files which she printed with an inkjet printer set to “border-less printing”. You can actually print one yourself: download this 5555 A4 pages PDF, print it out, place 1500 empty pages on top and 1500 at the bottom of the printed stack. Voila, you have one of the stacks.

 

19:30 Stacks – today and tomorrow.

8 Sep 2011, 9:16am
curation semiotic
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Rachel Whiteread

 

 

Mike Bruce / Hammer Museum

These wood objects were collected by Whiteread’s young son as a substitute for the toy guns he was forbidden to own.

via Rachel Whiteread – latimes.com.

Lang/Baumann

2001 Stadion Dynamo Kiev, Kiev UKR, “Dreamgames”

http://www.langbaumann.com/

Démos de tous les jours – Mathieu Tremblin

Fruits Skewer

2011, Nijmegen (NL)
Anti-vandalism furniture, fruits, 0,5 x 0,5 m

Rock’n Gum

2010, Rennes (FR)
Chewing gum sticker, tattoo pattern, 30 x 30 cm

 

http://www.demodetouslesjours.eu/

Untitled | Flickr

 

 

memo camera | Flickr – Photo Sharing!.

LOVE on DesignMarketo

LOVE, for Japan—by Akinori Oishi

Like anyone this past week, we’ve been following the aftermath of the terrible events in Japan. We decided to produce a series of posters to support and encourage your donations. For the first poster we asked our friends Akinori Oishi to draw and All Cats Are Grey to print.

Silkscreen print, 2 colours, on Somerset “rough edges” 220g approx. 50×70cm—edition of 50.

More links:

Akinori Oishi
aki-air.com/

printed by:
All Cats Are Grey
www.allcatsaregreyprints.com/

Get it there: LOVE on DesignMarketo.

Gene Davis – Philadelphia Street Painting, 1972 / Aqua-Velvet

Street Painting – Franklin’s Footpath / Photographer: Henry Groskinsky, 1972

Artist Gene Davis putting finishing touches on his 414-ft-long painting. “Franklin’s Footpath,” painted on the street in front of the Philadelphia Museum of Art.

via Gene Davis – Philadelphia Street Painting, 1972 / Aqua-Velvet.

even*cleveland: on a grand scale

In March of 2010, Jim Denevan and his crew created a large scale artwork on the frozen surface of Lake Baikal, Siberia. The spiral of circles, along a fibonacci curve, grow from an origin of 18″ to several miles in diameter.

'You've got to support whatever grand scheme, whether it's yours or someone else's. You never know why until you're actually in it and doing it.' – Caleb Coe

From The Anthropologist, via all the mountains. Amazing.

via even*cleveland: on a grand scale.

Art installation looking like a burning building

Isabelle Hayeur, an artist from Montreal, created “Fire with Fire,” an artwork that simulates a fire in a “four-storey heritage building in the downtown eastside.”

Via Make: This building is not actually on fire

Art installation looks like burning building – Boing Boing.

Giant penis crop-circle mysteriously erected at Eiffel Tower in Paris

Holy dueling Gallic phallic symbols, Batman! French journalist Aude Baron tells Boing Boing,

On Friday, if you were going to the Eiffel Tower, in Paris, you could see a giant penis! It was drawn into the snow covering the grass. A Dutch tourist took a picture and posted it on Twitter. Amazing view! But what if it was a PhotoShop? To be sure, I called the store which is a the first floor of the Tour Eiffel, and I was confirmed the masterpiece was still here, making everyone laugh. Unfortunately the garden department of Paris city hall told me they would soon rake it up.

Giant penis crop-circle mysteriously erected at Eiffel Tower in Paris – Boing Boing.

Full story here in Lepost.fr. The original picture is here

Bodies in Urban Spaces – Photo Journal – WSJ

Performers form a “human sculpture” on Sunday during a piece entitled “Bodies in Urban Spaces” by choreographer Willi Dorner. (Bryan Derballa for The Wall Street Journal)

Bodies in Urban Spaces – Photo Journal – WSJ.

Russian art group Voina “dicks” a St. Petersburg Bridge – Boing Boing

Over the years, Voina staged many actions: police station take-overs, anti-homophobic faux-lynchings in malls, stray cat throwing into swanky restaurants, anti-Medvedev public orgies and all kinds of ruckus. Their most recent target: the headquarters of FSB, the offices of Russia’s KGB incarnate Federal Security Service. Our source: Voina themselves.

In the early morn of Che Guevara’s birthday, the group psyched out bascule bridge guards and made their way to the center of Liteiny Bridge. In 23 seconds flat, Voina painted a 213-feet-tall, 89-feet-wide phallus dubbed “Giant Galactic Space Dick.”

Russian art group Voina “dicks” a St. Petersburg Bridge – Boing Boing.

Loose Associations and Other Lectures, Ryan Gander, 2009

gander

Edition limited to 250 numbered copies

Pdf can be downloaded (free) here

Purchased at Publish & Be Damned.

‘250cm line tattooed on six paid people,’ Santiago Sierra

santiagoserra

Espacio Aglutinador Havana December 1999

Galerie Peter Kilchmann Zurich

In 1999, Spanish artist Santiago Sierra paid six unemployed young men in Cuba to take part in one of his installation pieces. The men were offered $30 each to participate, and stripped to their shorts to become a part of another of Sierra’s human experiments, this time in the Espacia Aglutinador, Havana’s oldest art space. And their job? To go under the needle. Sierra had the men tattooed – one straight, horizontal line reaching across each of their backs.

A line-up of young, able warriors symbolically inked for social battle.

via

Raven Smith

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Raven Smith’s performance-based photographs train a sharp eye on themes of identity, vanity, myth making and notions of the ideal. Smith’s work is both elegant and irrational—fundamentally stripping down complex notions of how we build our own image in the face of our personal and collective histories or myths. Smith catalogues his decisive misbehaviors with clarity and humour, investigating the relationship between the self, behavior and the role of the absurd in deconstructing latent notions of immortality or the immutability of established values and norms.

Raven Smith

Marcel Duchamp, Mile of String

In 1942, Andre Breton organised a retrospective exhibition of Surrealist art in New York: First Papers of Surrealism. For the vernissage Marcel Duchamp created this installation – a gigantic web – called the Mile of String. He and Breton furthermore arranged for a number of children to ball in the room thereby making it very difficult for the guests to see the paintings.

via