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Set Design: Portraits made from household objects from Blommers / Schumm

Midas-touch Dutch duo Blommers / Schumm have been making the world look cooler for years. Their brilliant photoshoots and set design for the trendiest magazines are so consistently excellent that we barely even have to look at one of their projects before we whack it on It’s Nice That. This one, though, is by far my favourite. For a show in Amsterdam the duo paired up with Erwin Olaf and Petra Stavast to create Renaissance portraits out of household objects. So simple but meticulously done. Watch a making-of animation on their site to see the projects in their full glory.

via Its Nice That : Set Design: Portraits made from household objects from Blommers / Schumm.

Mandy Barker: SOUP

SOUP is a description given to plastic debris suspended in the sea,
and with particular reference to the mass accumulation that exists
in an area of The North Pacific Ocean known as the Garbage Patch.
The series of images aim to engage with, and stimulate an emotional
response in the viewer by combining a contradiction between initial
aesthetic attraction and social awareness. The sequence reveals a
narrative concerning oceanic plastics from initial attraction and
attempted ingestion, to the ultimate death of sea creatures and
representing the disturbing statistics of dispersed plastics having
no boundaries.

All the plastics photographed have been salvaged from beaches
around the world and represent a global collection of debris that
has existed for varying amounts of time in the world’s oceans.

The captions record the plastic ingredients in each image providing
the viewer with the realisation and facts of what exists in the sea.

Evan Roth: Multi-Touch Finger Paintings

Evan Roth 

 

 

“Launch Twitter. Check Twitter. Close Twitter.”

Multi-Touch Finger Paintings
Ink
Tracing paper
iPod Touch
2.3in x 4.4in
Paris
2011

 

Bodies in Urban Spaces – Photo Journal – WSJ

Performers form a “human sculpture” on Sunday during a piece entitled “Bodies in Urban Spaces” by choreographer Willi Dorner. (Bryan Derballa for The Wall Street Journal)

Bodies in Urban Spaces – Photo Journal – WSJ.

Henrique Oliveira at the Rice Gallery

From the Rice Gallery:

Oliveira uses tapumes, which in Portuguese can mean “fencing,” “boarding,” or “enclosure,” as a title for many of his large-scale installations. The term makes reference to the temporary wooden construction fences seen throughout the city of São Paulo where Oliveira lives. It also refers to the weathered wood Oliveira uses as the primary material in his installations.

Early on, Oliveira experimented with the surfaces of his paintings by gluing newspaper onto a canvas and scraping it, or mixing sand with the paint. A breakthrough occurred while he was a student at the University of São Paulo, where for two years the view from his studio window was a wooden construction fence. Over time Oliveira began to see the deterioration of the wood and its separation into multiple layers and colors as similar to the process of painting. One week before the final student show opened, the construction was finished and the worn out plywood fence was discarded. Oliveira collected the wood and used it in his first installation.

Oliveira’s installations, which he refers to as “tridimensionals,” have evolved into massive, spatial constructions that combine painting, architecture, and sculpture. In some installations he uses walls as supports, attaching and shaping lengths of PVC tubing to create enormous, protruding forms over which he layers thin sheets of wood. In others, he arranges thousands of pieces of painted wood into gestural abstract “paintings” that spill off the wall into the viewer’s space. The constants in Oliveira’s work are the visual and tactile qualities of wood that has been exposed to the elements, and though he incorporates new, flexible plywood into his work, his primary material remains the discarded wood collected on the streets of São Paulo.

Visit Henrique Oliveira’s website – here.

via Henrique Oliveira at the Rice Gallery » CONTEMPORIST.

14 Mar 2010, 12:18pm
ephemeral everyday
by
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Jan Kath: Erased Classic

today and tomorrow – Page 16

http://www.jan-kath.de/

They are based on classic patterns from Italian wall coverings and Indian saris. The carpets are produced by weavers at manufacturing sites in Kathmandu. But their final look is caused by acid, which makes the patterns fade and disappear. The customer cannot only define the color, materials, size, knot density, and design, but also the degree of erosion.