Portfolio

Refreshment: The Art of Perpetual Evaporation

Refreshment: The Art of Perpetual Evaporation | Colossal.

 

Water is spilled on a stone pavement leaving a small stain. As time passes the stain dries up, shrinks and changes shape. Just before the water is completely evaporated the process is put on hold. The new shape of the stain is then being enlarged and recreated with new water. This process repeats and with these interventions the ‘life’ of the stain is artificially refreshed and extended to an unnatural length. Which allows new shapes to evolve that otherwise could never have existed.

johanrijpma.nl

saudi arabia bir hima petroglyphs | Flickr – Photo Sharing!

The pre-Islamic rock art of Arabia at Bir Hima, carved into the eastern foothills of the Asir Mountains, is one of the most important rock art sites in Saudi Arabia. Most of what youll see dates from around 5500 BC, athough there are more recent examples scattered around.

via saudi arabia bir hima petroglyphs | Flickr – Photo Sharing!.

13 Feb 2012, 4:38pm
drawing Wabi Sabi
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Shane McAdams: Ball Point Pen Paintings | ArtFlakes – Blog

 

 

 

 

Shane McAdams, an artist and writer living in Brooklyn, NY, created stunning paintings by just using ball point pens and resin. His technique involves some sort of elaborate method in which the chosen pen has its cartridge removed and its contents blown out on panels before the whole lot gets taken to a tanning salon for a bit of UV light-blasting.

via Shane McAdams: Ball Point Pen Paintings | ArtFlakes – Blog.

13 Feb 2012, 10:19am
curation Wabi Sabi
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“My Favorite Museum Exhibit”: Butterflies eating a piranha

This is not a spot of whimsy, people. This kind of thing really does happen. In fact, you can watch a real-life example (with a less-threatening fish substituted in for the piranha) in a video taken in Alabama’s Bankhead National Forest.

The good news: The butterflies are not really carnivorous, per se. The bad news: What they’re actually doing is still pretty damn creepy.

It’s called “puddling” or “mud-puddling”. The basic idea works like this: Butterflies get most of their diet in the form of nectar. They’re pollinators. But nectar doesn’t have all the nutrients and minerals butterflies need to survive, so they have to dip their probosces into some other food sources, as well. Depending on the species of butterfly, those other sources can include: Mineral-rich water in a shallow mud puddle, animal poop, and (yes) carrion.

When butterflies puddle over a dead fish, though, they aren’t biting off chunks. Instead, they’re essentially licking the dead fish—going after salt and minerals that seep out of the dead animal as it decomposes. Bonus: Some butterflies also like to lick the sweat off of humans. And a few species of moth have been documented sucking blood and tears for living animals, including humans.

“My Favorite Museum Exhibit”: Butterflies eating a piranha – Boing Boing.

Mandy Barker: SOUP

SOUP is a description given to plastic debris suspended in the sea,
and with particular reference to the mass accumulation that exists
in an area of The North Pacific Ocean known as the Garbage Patch.
The series of images aim to engage with, and stimulate an emotional
response in the viewer by combining a contradiction between initial
aesthetic attraction and social awareness. The sequence reveals a
narrative concerning oceanic plastics from initial attraction and
attempted ingestion, to the ultimate death of sea creatures and
representing the disturbing statistics of dispersed plastics having
no boundaries.

All the plastics photographed have been salvaged from beaches
around the world and represent a global collection of debris that
has existed for varying amounts of time in the world’s oceans.

The captions record the plastic ingredients in each image providing
the viewer with the realisation and facts of what exists in the sea.

wind paintings

 

 

 

 

 

If there’s a single thing that keeps me working in design, it’s that moment when you look at something for the first time and it simply takes your breath away. That’s exactly what happened when I saw these beautiful Wind Paintings from artist Bob Verschueren. Verschueren worked in the 1970s and 80s using wind to create these stunning landscape pieces. Each work would focus on a material like iron oxide, yellow ochre or burnt umber, which was then laid out in linear patterns on the land. Verschueren would let the wind move and blow the pigments around and create an altered version of the shape that represented the stunning collaboration between man and nature. Though these pieces were created years ago, Tom at I Love Belgium is celebrating them on his fantastic blog and was kind enough to send them my way. Click here to check out more of Verschueren’s work online; it’s the sort of artwork that makes me want to throw this laptop aside and run outside. xo, grace

wind paintings | Design*Sponge.

LOVE on DesignMarketo

LOVE, for Japan—by Akinori Oishi

Like anyone this past week, we’ve been following the aftermath of the terrible events in Japan. We decided to produce a series of posters to support and encourage your donations. For the first poster we asked our friends Akinori Oishi to draw and All Cats Are Grey to print.

Silkscreen print, 2 colours, on Somerset “rough edges” 220g approx. 50×70cm—edition of 50.

More links:

Akinori Oishi
aki-air.com/

printed by:
All Cats Are Grey
www.allcatsaregreyprints.com/

Get it there: LOVE on DesignMarketo.