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Refreshment: The Art of Perpetual Evaporation

Refreshment: The Art of Perpetual Evaporation | Colossal.

 

Water is spilled on a stone pavement leaving a small stain. As time passes the stain dries up, shrinks and changes shape. Just before the water is completely evaporated the process is put on hold. The new shape of the stain is then being enlarged and recreated with new water. This process repeats and with these interventions the ‘life’ of the stain is artificially refreshed and extended to an unnatural length. Which allows new shapes to evolve that otherwise could never have existed.

johanrijpma.nl

22 Jan 2014, 5:02pm
ephemeral mapping
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A Geological Epiphany: Magdalena Jetelovà’s Iceland Project (1992) : socks-studio

All images : © Magdalena Jetelovà

A GEOLOGICAL EPIPHANY: MAGDALENA JETELOVÀ’S ICELAND PROJECT (1992)

 

Magdalena Jetelovà is a Czech artist living in Munich, Düsseldorf and Prague. She became famous for her large wooden sculptures of furnitures (tables, chairs and stairs in Durmast wood) and for her 1990′s installations, such as “Domestication of Pyramids“. Starting from the 1990′s she’s also realised a series of light interventions in the territory, in order to expose hidden artificial or natural structures of the landscape, documented through very dark B/W photography.

In the Iceland Project the artist used lasers to visualize the local geological condition called “Undersea intercontinental divide”, a divergent tectonic plate boundary. The so-called Mid Atlantic Ridge is located along the floor of the ocean, and cuts Iceland in two halves.  According to Wikipediathe section of the ridge which includes the island of Iceland is also known as the Reykjanes Ridge. The average spreading rate for the ridge is about 2.5 cm per year.

via A Geological Epiphany: Magdalena Jetelovà’s Iceland Project (1992) : socks-studio.

Choros: A Transfixing Experimental Dance Film by Michael Langan & Terah Maher | Colossal

 

Choros from Michael Langan on Vimeo.

Released three weeks ago after a year on tour at various film festivals, Choros is the latest experimental art film from director Michael Langan the explores the movement of the human body, specifically the motion of dancer Terah Maher. Choros follows in the steps of Eadweard Muybridge, Etienne-Jules Marey, and Norman McLaren, all of whom spent years studying the physical moment of animals and humans through film. Langan takes the next step using new digital innovations to layer some 32 sequential instances of a single movement and then stretch it out over time. Set to Steve Reich’s Music for 18 Musicians, the 13-minute video is pulsating, hypnotic, and flat out lovely to watch. 

 

Choros: A Transfixing Experimental Dance Film by Michael Langan & Terah Maher | Colossal.

Time-lapse Images of Nude Dancers Created with 10,000 Individual Photographs Colossal

Time-lapse Images of Nude Dancers Created with 10,000 Individual Photographs

NY-based photographer Shinichi Maruyama created these lovely photographs using nearly 10,000 individual photographs of a nude dancer in motion. The abstract images remind me of Japanese ink wash painting, as if the figures were cread by the stroke of a thick brush, which is not unsuprising considering Maruyama’s previous work with water sculptures. Of the photos Shin says:

I tried to capture the beauty of both the human body’s figure and its motion. The figure in the image, which is formed into something similar to a sculpture, is created by combining 10,000 individual photographs of a dancer. By putting together uninterrupted individual moments, the resulting image as a whole will appear to be something different from what actually exists. With regard to these two viewpoints, a connection can be made to a human being’s perception of presence in life.

See much more on his website. All images courtesy the artist. (via kottke, petapixel)

via Time-lapse Images of Nude Dancers Created with 10,000 Individual Photographs Colossal.

Moth Trails at Night | Colossal

 

Ontario-based ceramicist Steve Irvine caught this wonderful long exposure shot of fluttering moths swirling around a floodlight at night. Via National Geographic:

Fluttering wings leave lacy trails as moths beat their way to a floodlight on a rural Ontario lawn. The midsummer night’s exposure, held for 20 seconds, captured some of the hundreds of insects engaged in a nocturnal swarm.

Moth Trails at Night | Colossal.

Kurt Perschke’s Giant Inflatable RedBall UK Project | Colossal

 

via Video Timelapse of Kurt Perschke’s Giant Inflatable RedBall UK Project | Colossal.

 This summer, New York artist Kurt Perschke brought his famous RedBall project to the UK for the first time, installing his massive inflatable red ball in a total of 20 sites around the country. Photos of the public installations flooded the news and photo sharing sites likeFlickr and Instagram, and I tried to live vicariously through them and imagine what it might be like to stand in the completely transformed spaces inhabited by this giant red sphere. Lucky for us filmmaker Danny Cooke was on hand during the entire RedBall UK trip and edited together this fantastic timelapse of the installation as it moved from location to location around the country. I recommend sitting back and watching it much larger for the full effect.

Light Stencils Commemorate Victims of the 2011 Christchurch Earthquake | Colossal

 

 

The 2011 Christchurch earthquake was the largest natural disaster in New Zealand’s history, claiming the lives of 181 people and leaving behind nearly $30 billion in rebuilding costs. Touched by the events of that February day, photographer Fabrice Wittner set out to confront the destruction the best way he knew how: by making art. His Enlightened Souls project utilizes large, human-sized stencils that are painted with light during long exposures, creating thin portraits that appear almost like holograms. Many more images and process shots can be seen here. Images courtesy the artist. (via behance)

Light Stencils Commemorate Victims of the 2011 Christchurch Earthquake | Colossal.

wind paintings

 

 

 

 

 

If there’s a single thing that keeps me working in design, it’s that moment when you look at something for the first time and it simply takes your breath away. That’s exactly what happened when I saw these beautiful Wind Paintings from artist Bob Verschueren. Verschueren worked in the 1970s and 80s using wind to create these stunning landscape pieces. Each work would focus on a material like iron oxide, yellow ochre or burnt umber, which was then laid out in linear patterns on the land. Verschueren would let the wind move and blow the pigments around and create an altered version of the shape that represented the stunning collaboration between man and nature. Though these pieces were created years ago, Tom at I Love Belgium is celebrating them on his fantastic blog and was kind enough to send them my way. Click here to check out more of Verschueren’s work online; it’s the sort of artwork that makes me want to throw this laptop aside and run outside. xo, grace

wind paintings | Design*Sponge.

Démos de tous les jours – Mathieu Tremblin

Fruits Skewer

2011, Nijmegen (NL)
Anti-vandalism furniture, fruits, 0,5 x 0,5 m

Rock’n Gum

2010, Rennes (FR)
Chewing gum sticker, tattoo pattern, 30 x 30 cm

 

http://www.demodetouslesjours.eu/

even*cleveland: on a grand scale

In March of 2010, Jim Denevan and his crew created a large scale artwork on the frozen surface of Lake Baikal, Siberia. The spiral of circles, along a fibonacci curve, grow from an origin of 18″ to several miles in diameter.

'You've got to support whatever grand scheme, whether it's yours or someone else's. You never know why until you're actually in it and doing it.' – Caleb Coe

From The Anthropologist, via all the mountains. Amazing.

via even*cleveland: on a grand scale.

Giant penis crop-circle mysteriously erected at Eiffel Tower in Paris

Holy dueling Gallic phallic symbols, Batman! French journalist Aude Baron tells Boing Boing,

On Friday, if you were going to the Eiffel Tower, in Paris, you could see a giant penis! It was drawn into the snow covering the grass. A Dutch tourist took a picture and posted it on Twitter. Amazing view! But what if it was a PhotoShop? To be sure, I called the store which is a the first floor of the Tour Eiffel, and I was confirmed the masterpiece was still here, making everyone laugh. Unfortunately the garden department of Paris city hall told me they would soon rake it up.

Giant penis crop-circle mysteriously erected at Eiffel Tower in Paris – Boing Boing.

Full story here in Lepost.fr. The original picture is here

Michael Sirianni :: Slow Burn

Michael Sirianni :: Slow Burn.

Graham, Dan: Time Delay Room

Dan Graham
«Time Delay Room»

This closed-circuit installation was varied by Dan Graham six times following the same structural set-up as described below:
«Two rooms of equal size, connected by an opening at one side, under surveillance by two video cameras positioned at the connecting point between the two rooms. The front inside wall of each features two video screens – within the scope of the surveillance cameras. The monitor which the visitor coming out of the other room spies first shows the live behavior of the people in the respective other room. In both rooms, the second screen shows an image of the behavior of the viewers in the respectively other room – but with an eight second delay.
The time-lag of eight seconds is the outer limit of the neurophysiological short-term memory that forms an immediate part of our present perception and affects this «from within». If you see your behavior eight seconds ago presented on a video monitor «from outside» you will probably therefore not recognize the distance in time but tend to identify your current perception and current behavior with the state eight seconds earlier. Since this leads to inconsistent impressions which you then respond to, you get caught up in a feedback loop. You feel trapped in a state of observation, in which your self-observation is subject to some outside visible control. In this manner, you as the viewer experience yourself as part of a social group of observed observers [instead of, as in the traditional view of art, standing arrested in individual contemplation before an auratic object].

(Gregor Stemmrich, «Dan Graham,» in Thomas Y. Levin, Ursula Frohne, Peter Weibel (eds.), CTRL[SPACE]. Rhetorics of Surveillance from Bentham to Big Brother, ZKM | Center for Art and Media, Karlsruhe, 2001, The MIT Press, Cambridge, MA, London, 2002, p. 68.)

Media Art Net | Graham, Dan: Time Delay Room.

A North Korean anniversary and debut – The Big Picture – Boston.com

A North Korean anniversary and debut – The Big Picture – Boston.com.

Bodies in Urban Spaces – Photo Journal – WSJ

Performers form a “human sculpture” on Sunday during a piece entitled “Bodies in Urban Spaces” by choreographer Willi Dorner. (Bryan Derballa for The Wall Street Journal)

Bodies in Urban Spaces – Photo Journal – WSJ.

7 Aug 2010, 10:24pm
camouflage ephemeral
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The Trap of Goddess – Miyake Genro

The Trap of Goddess – Miyake Genro

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Hello, world! by Bernd Hopfengaertner

Hello, world! is a real installation for the virtual globe of the software Google
Earth. A Semacode measuring 160×160 metres was mown into a wheat field near the town of Ilmenau in the Land Thuringia. The code consists of 18×18 bright and dark squares producing decoded the phrase “Hello, world!”. The ambition was to have an areal view of the code integrated in Google Earths’ regular database. The project was realised in May 2006 and photographs were taken of it during a picture flight in the following month.

www.berndhopfengaertner.net

All available sizes | dorfcode.jpg | Flickr – Photo Sharing!.

Rainbow, Helmut Smits

Rainbow « Helmut Smits.

Title: Rainbow
Year: 2010
Materials: acrylic paint
Photos by Lotte Stekelenburg

Folded Paper – Simon Schubert

’ve just rediscovered the amazing paper art by

. It’s not really clear if he really folds the paper or if he rubs the lines into the paper. Anyway, amazing work!
Some of these pieces are more abstract than his previous work.

via Folded Paper – today and tomorrow.

ërell / St Etienne Zone commercial Alphabet

ërell // St Etienne Zone commercial Alphabet on Flickr – Photo Sharing!.

Guerilla Paint Action in Berlin

Last week a group of cyclists dumped 13 gallons of paint on the road at Berlin’s busy Rosenthaler Platz, creating a series of colourful lines as cars drove through.

The various colours of paint were dumped onto the road in large puddles at different locations throughout the intersection. As traffic drove through, the paint was spread around creating lots of colourful lines. The whole action took only a few seconds: bikers had poured paint from big boxes in front of cars that waited for green lights. So the cars and their wheels, if the driver wanted it or not, became the brush tool for this guerilla public art piece.The creators of the project posted signs on post nearby explaining that the paint wasn’t harmful and would simply wash off with water.

Posted by Anita Silva – on Abitare – international design magazine » Guerilla Paint Action in Berlin.

Kevin Van Aelst

Right Middle Finger,†2007, digital C-print, 43 x 34.5

via Kevin Van Aelst.

Sten and Lex’s “Poster Stencils”

Sara and I have been following the work of Sten and Lex in Italy for many years. We’ absolutel love their latest body of work, created for their current solo show at the CO2 GALLERY in Rome.

They call this recent series “Poster Stencils” because, in essence, they are both stencils and posters at the same time. The video above shows their process of pasting up the matrix of the stencil, cut on paper, on a panel of wood as a poster. They then paint on the matrix in black and when it all all dry they destroy the matrix, letting some parts of the matrix stay pasted to the wood. In this manner the stencil is not reproducible and the matrix “dies” in the work itself.

via Wooster Collective

14 Mar 2010, 12:18pm
ephemeral everyday
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Jan Kath: Erased Classic

today and tomorrow – Page 16

http://www.jan-kath.de/

They are based on classic patterns from Italian wall coverings and Indian saris. The carpets are produced by weavers at manufacturing sites in Kathmandu. But their final look is caused by acid, which makes the patterns fade and disappear. The customer cannot only define the color, materials, size, knot density, and design, but also the degree of erosion.

Dayton Castleman: Bread Bird

An inquiry as to whether birds would eat bread in the shape of their own. In this case, Chicago pigeons would not.

today and tomorrow – Page 8

http://daytoncastleman.com/home.html

Japanese apples


Japanese apples.

Photography by Jane Alden Stevens

Les chemins du désir (Gaston Bachelard)

This past winter, the snow stayed so long we almost forgot what the ground looked like. In Detroit, there is little money for plowing; after a big storm, the streets and sidewalks disappear for days. Soon new pathways emerge, side streets get dug out one car-width wide. Bootprints through parks veer far from the buried sidewalks. Without the city to tell him where to walk, the pilgrim who first sets out in fresh snowfall creates his own path. Others will likely follow, or forge their own paths as needed.

In the heart of summer, too, it becomes clear that the grid laid down by the ancient planners is now irrelevant. In vacant lots between neighborhoods and the attractions of thoroughfares, bus stops and liquor stores, well-worn paths stretch across hundreds of vacant lots. Gaston Bachelard called these les chemins du désir: pathways of desire. Paths that weren’t designed but eroded casually away by individuals finding the shortest distance between where they are coming from and where they intend to go.

It is an urban legend on many college campuses that many sidewalks and pathways were not planned at all, but paved by the university after students created their own paths from building to building, straying from those originally prescribed. The Motor City, like a college campus, has a large population that cannot afford cars, relying instead on bikes and feet to meet its needs. With enormous swaths of the city returning to prairie, where sidewalks are irrelevant and sometimes even dangerous, desire lines have become an integral yet entirely unintended part of the city’s infrastructure.

Streets With No Name | sweet juniper!.

11 Oct 2009, 4:44pm
ephemeral quotes
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Time doesn’t exist Clocks exist

time

Don’t know where, don’t know who.

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