Portfolio

9 May 2018, 12:25pm
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Cooking with Scorsese, Hato

Iron-cooked ham and cheese sandwiches, cailles en sarcophagi, explosive pissing beef balls; low, high, accessible, obscure, comical – food, like art, is served up in various guises, but whatever form it takes, it shares the common traits of being a stimulant as well as a necessity for living. Food and art also share a common space at the heart of Hato’s practice. Each day they serve up a communal afternoon meal, creating an opportunity to down tools and enjoy the moment. Now, with this book – a black- and-white trailer for a full colour feature to be published soon – they welcome you to join in this homage to both food, and to films that celebrate eating in all sorts of compelling ways. – Ananda Pellerin, Editor, The Gourmand

Cooking With Scorsese Vol. 1 by Hato Press

 

9 May 2018, 12:21pm
curation
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The Clock, Christian Marclay

A major work by New York–based artist Christian Marclay, The Clock mines the history of film for moments from everyday life and thrilling only-in-the-movies events that indicate the passage of time. Synchronized with local time, cinematic and actual time run parallel in a 24-hour montage.

People Power by Damien Poulain

People Power by Damien Poulain

‘People Power’
Series of 10 protest banners inspired by iconic protest songs.
 

http://damienpoulain.com/

27 Feb 2017, 4:04pm
consumption
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Sobriety coins

sobriety coin is a token given to Alcoholics Anonymous or other 12 step group members representing the amount of time the member has remained sober.

When a twelve-step member is presented with his or her first chip, they are often told, “This chip represents AA’s commitment to you – not your commitment to us”. Sobriety coins themselves do not necessarily help the holder stay sober, but studies have shown a connection between the visual presence of the coin and the holder’s self-resolve. The coins are meant to motivate the holder to continue their abstention from the subject of their addiction.

27 Feb 2017, 4:00pm
packaging
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How to Wrap Five Eggs: Traditional Japanese Packaging by Hideyuki Oka

10. 

Sections of fresh bamboo are split to form the sticks for these traditional candies from the old castle town of Sendai. The holder is also of bamboo, and the arrangement,
suggesting sprays of flowers, displays both the charm and the great usefulness of the plant.

12.

 Ordinary rice straw is used imaginatively to create a most functional and beautiful container. Since a set of items in Japan is five rather tha half a dozen
(five teacups, five cake plates, and the like), this carrier contains just five eggs. Devised by farmers in Yamagate Prefecture in northern Japan, it is an example
of packaging born of rural necessity. Interestingly enough, it seems to emphasize the freshness of the egg.

 

 

27 Feb 2017, 3:57pm
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The typographic form in the Umbrella Movement

 

“No to Pre-selected Candidates” banner on a back-lit bus shelter advertising. Unintentionally combining the written banner with the calligraphic artwork of a property development artwork.

In a city where the majority of writing is finger scribbled on the screen of a smartphone, Hong Kong’s Umbrella Movement has developed into an unexpected platform for handwriting and handmade typography.

Creative Review – Words of the Umbrella Movement.

Refreshment: The Art of Perpetual Evaporation

Refreshment: The Art of Perpetual Evaporation | Colossal.

 

Water is spilled on a stone pavement leaving a small stain. As time passes the stain dries up, shrinks and changes shape. Just before the water is completely evaporated the process is put on hold. The new shape of the stain is then being enlarged and recreated with new water. This process repeats and with these interventions the ‘life’ of the stain is artificially refreshed and extended to an unnatural length. Which allows new shapes to evolve that otherwise could never have existed.

johanrijpma.nl

16 Feb 2014, 6:56pm
language
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Fiona Banner | IMAGE OBJECT TEXT

Apocalypse Now

A handwritten text on a page the size and shape of a cinema screen

Fiona Banner, Every Word Unmade, 2007

 

 

Fiona Banner | IMAGE OBJECT TEXT.

22 Jan 2014, 5:02pm
ephemeral mapping
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A Geological Epiphany: Magdalena Jetelovà’s Iceland Project (1992) : socks-studio

All images : © Magdalena Jetelovà

A GEOLOGICAL EPIPHANY: MAGDALENA JETELOVÀ’S ICELAND PROJECT (1992)

 

Magdalena Jetelovà is a Czech artist living in Munich, Düsseldorf and Prague. She became famous for her large wooden sculptures of furnitures (tables, chairs and stairs in Durmast wood) and for her 1990′s installations, such as “Domestication of Pyramids“. Starting from the 1990′s she’s also realised a series of light interventions in the territory, in order to expose hidden artificial or natural structures of the landscape, documented through very dark B/W photography.

In the Iceland Project the artist used lasers to visualize the local geological condition called “Undersea intercontinental divide”, a divergent tectonic plate boundary. The so-called Mid Atlantic Ridge is located along the floor of the ocean, and cuts Iceland in two halves.  According to Wikipediathe section of the ridge which includes the island of Iceland is also known as the Reykjanes Ridge. The average spreading rate for the ridge is about 2.5 cm per year.

via A Geological Epiphany: Magdalena Jetelovà’s Iceland Project (1992) : socks-studio.

20 Jan 2014, 9:47pm
choreography
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Amazing Video Clips Visually Isolate the Flight Paths of Birds

 

Hlynsky first started filming birds in 2005 using a small Flip video recorder, but now uses a Lumix GH2 to record gigabytes of bird footage from locations around Rhode Island. He then edits select clips with After Effects and other tools to create brief visual trails that illustrate the path of each moving bird. Non-moving objects like trees and telephone poles remain stationary, and with the added ambient noise of where he was filming, an amazing balance between abstraction and reality emerges. The birds you see aren’t digitally animated or layered in any way, but are shown just as they’ve flown, creating a sort of temporary time-lapse.

Amazing Video Clips Visually Isolate the Flight Paths of Birds | Colossal.

13 Jan 2014, 3:08pm
typography
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Department International

Department International is a collaborative design practice via London & NYC.

via Department International.

17 Dec 2013, 8:02pm
curation
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Midday Traffic in San Diego Collapsed and Reorganized by Color

 

 

In this new video art clip from San Diego-based filmmaker Cy Kuckenbaker, we watch as a 4-minute shot from the Washington Street bridge in San Diego is deftly edited, sorted, and compressed resulting in perfectly color-coded traffic. Kuckenbaker notes:

The source footage for this video is a 4-minute shot from the Washington Street bridge above State Route 163 in San Diego captured at 2:39pm Oct 1, 2013. My aim is to reveal the color palette and color preferences of contemporary San Diego drivers in addition to traffic patterns and volumes. There are no CG elements, these are all real cars that have been removed from one sample and reorganized.

The filmmaker wowed us at about this time last year when he condensed five hours of plane landings into 30 seconds. (via Stellar)

Midday Traffic in San Diego Collapsed and Reorganized by Color | Colossal.

Set Design: Portraits made from household objects from Blommers / Schumm

Midas-touch Dutch duo Blommers / Schumm have been making the world look cooler for years. Their brilliant photoshoots and set design for the trendiest magazines are so consistently excellent that we barely even have to look at one of their projects before we whack it on It’s Nice That. This one, though, is by far my favourite. For a show in Amsterdam the duo paired up with Erwin Olaf and Petra Stavast to create Renaissance portraits out of household objects. So simple but meticulously done. Watch a making-of animation on their site to see the projects in their full glory.

via Its Nice That : Set Design: Portraits made from household objects from Blommers / Schumm.

14 Nov 2013, 7:06pm
consumption
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My Things 2001 – 2009 by Hong Hao

My Things 2001 – 2009 by Hong Hao above, began 12 years ago, with all the goods that the artist consumed being scanned piece by piece to create a visual diary, then categorised and made into a collage.

via Creative Review – Oil fields, sex dolls and a 12 year diary of consumption.

Fear in a field

 

via RoosBros. Fear in a field.

Fear expanded – 2012 is an artwork by Ryan Everson in collaboration with Jason Garcia.  The further away  you go, the more the big mirror clad letters are merging into the landscape.

Geometric Coin Sculptures by Robert Wechsler

Geometric Coin Sculptures by Robert Wechsler

Artist Robert Wechsler (previously) was recently comissioned by the The New Yorker to create a series of coin sculptures for their October 14th money-themed edition. Wechsler used a jeweler’s saw to cut precise notches in coins from various currencies and then joined them together in several geometric forms. While nine pieces were selected for the magazine, a total of 22 were created, all of which can be seen in his Money gallery. (viaColossal Submissions)

via Geometric Coin Sculptures by Robert Wechsler | Colossal.

19 Oct 2013, 9:57am
curation photography
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Marina Abramović Made Me Cry

 

Photographs by Marco Anelli. From the book:PORTRAITS IN THE PRESENCE OF MARINA ABRAMOVIC (Marco Anelli © 2010) http://www.marcoanelli.com/portraitsbook_e.html

Portraits taken during the MoMA’s exhibit of performance artist “Marina Abramović: The Artist Is Present”. Abramović sits at a table in silence, and museum guests can sit across from her and stare.

Some people couldn’t handle the heat.

Tumblr by: Katie Notopoulos 

Marina Abramović Made Me Cry.

Choros: A Transfixing Experimental Dance Film by Michael Langan & Terah Maher | Colossal

 

Choros from Michael Langan on Vimeo.

Released three weeks ago after a year on tour at various film festivals, Choros is the latest experimental art film from director Michael Langan the explores the movement of the human body, specifically the motion of dancer Terah Maher. Choros follows in the steps of Eadweard Muybridge, Etienne-Jules Marey, and Norman McLaren, all of whom spent years studying the physical moment of animals and humans through film. Langan takes the next step using new digital innovations to layer some 32 sequential instances of a single movement and then stretch it out over time. Set to Steve Reich’s Music for 18 Musicians, the 13-minute video is pulsating, hypnotic, and flat out lovely to watch. 

 

Choros: A Transfixing Experimental Dance Film by Michael Langan & Terah Maher | Colossal.

Time-lapse Images of Nude Dancers Created with 10,000 Individual Photographs Colossal

Time-lapse Images of Nude Dancers Created with 10,000 Individual Photographs

NY-based photographer Shinichi Maruyama created these lovely photographs using nearly 10,000 individual photographs of a nude dancer in motion. The abstract images remind me of Japanese ink wash painting, as if the figures were cread by the stroke of a thick brush, which is not unsuprising considering Maruyama’s previous work with water sculptures. Of the photos Shin says:

I tried to capture the beauty of both the human body’s figure and its motion. The figure in the image, which is formed into something similar to a sculpture, is created by combining 10,000 individual photographs of a dancer. By putting together uninterrupted individual moments, the resulting image as a whole will appear to be something different from what actually exists. With regard to these two viewpoints, a connection can be made to a human being’s perception of presence in life.

See much more on his website. All images courtesy the artist. (via kottke, petapixel)

via Time-lapse Images of Nude Dancers Created with 10,000 Individual Photographs Colossal.

saudi arabia bir hima petroglyphs | Flickr – Photo Sharing!

The pre-Islamic rock art of Arabia at Bir Hima, carved into the eastern foothills of the Asir Mountains, is one of the most important rock art sites in Saudi Arabia. Most of what youll see dates from around 5500 BC, athough there are more recent examples scattered around.

via saudi arabia bir hima petroglyphs | Flickr – Photo Sharing!.

Moth Trails at Night | Colossal

 

Ontario-based ceramicist Steve Irvine caught this wonderful long exposure shot of fluttering moths swirling around a floodlight at night. Via National Geographic:

Fluttering wings leave lacy trails as moths beat their way to a floodlight on a rural Ontario lawn. The midsummer night’s exposure, held for 20 seconds, captured some of the hundreds of insects engaged in a nocturnal swarm.

Moth Trails at Night | Colossal.

Edwin Deen’s Multi-Colored Sprinkler Paints On-demand Rainbows

 

Photo © Edwin Deen, Niels Post, Ampelhaus

Using some color pigment, an electric tap, a few meters of hose and a plain garden sprinkler, Deen transformed a simple garden sprinkler into a smile-inducing artistic device. I have the sudden urge to put on a white painter’s uniform and start prancing through this thing. The rainbow sprinkler will be on display at BARRY at the W in Amsterdam starting August 30th. All images courtesy the artist. And if you like this, also check out the Robo Rainbow. (via my amp goes to 11)

A Multi-Colored Sprinkler Paints On-demand Rainbows | Colossal.

Kurt Perschke’s Giant Inflatable RedBall UK Project | Colossal

 

via Video Timelapse of Kurt Perschke’s Giant Inflatable RedBall UK Project | Colossal.

 This summer, New York artist Kurt Perschke brought his famous RedBall project to the UK for the first time, installing his massive inflatable red ball in a total of 20 sites around the country. Photos of the public installations flooded the news and photo sharing sites likeFlickr and Instagram, and I tried to live vicariously through them and imagine what it might be like to stand in the completely transformed spaces inhabited by this giant red sphere. Lucky for us filmmaker Danny Cooke was on hand during the entire RedBall UK trip and edited together this fantastic timelapse of the installation as it moved from location to location around the country. I recommend sitting back and watching it much larger for the full effect.

Luke Evans & Josh Lake: I am a camera

We’ve seen some odd student projects in our time here at CR, but this must go down as one of the oddest: two Kingston students created human photograms by swallowing 35mm film, then, erm, expelling it, and recording the results

Luke Evans (above) and and Josh Lake (below) are in the final first year of the BA Graphic Design & Photography at Kingston University. For their final major project they “wanted to bring our insides out” they say. “So we ate 35mm photographic film slides and let our bodies do the rest.”

Both students ate pieces of 35mm slide film, ‘expelled’ it in the dark, fixed the silver and then scanned the pieces using an electron microscope in order to record the traces their bodies had left on the film’s surface.

“The full-sized images are 10,000 pixels on the longest edge, allowing you to see every detail of what our bodies produced,” they say, as can be seen from this shot of the work on show.

See more of Luke Evans’ work here

And Josh Lake’s here

 

Creative Review – I am a camera.

Corner I & III & IV – Tauba Auerbach

There are 3 new artworks on my wishlist: Corner I, Corner III and Corner IV by Tauba Auerbach. They’re ‘just’ white, woven canvases.

 

via Corner I & III & IV – today and tomorrow.

Descriptive Camera – Matt Richardson

Matt Richardson created a camera which doesn’t deliver a photo but a description of the photo it made. Eh what? After the shutter button is pressed, the Descriptive Camera sends the photo to Amazons Mechanical Turk for processing. Somewhere someone receives this photo and writes a short description about what’s on the photo, that person receives a small payment for this task. As soon as that text comes back, a thermal printer outputs the result in the style of a polaroid print.

How cool is that!

via Descriptive Camera – today and tomorrow.