Amandine Alessandra: News & Projects / Portfolio

  1. Type should move

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    “All is flux, nothing stays still, no man ever steps twice in the same river“, observed Heraclites.
    This intelligent (because human) letterform allows a message to change from an instant to another, in an attempt to reflect on the fleeting quality of the moment.
    It is flexible enough to keep the message relevant and up to date as its context changes, but also has the visual presence of a giant billboard.


  2. WOW!

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  3. As Lewis Carroll used to say

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    I have proved by actual trial that a letter, that takes an hour to write,
    takes only about 3 minutes to read!

    Lewis Carroll

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    The idea behind the experiment was to use a quote in another context to get it to say something
    slightly different. Carroll’s words are used in a tautologic way: the words/letters, which are about
    how long it takes to write a letter that is going to be read very fast, have taken literally
    hours to write/weave across the gate, and (hopefully) won’t take more than 3 minutes
    to be deciphered.

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    Amandine_Alessandra_Weaving


  4. A sure cure for seasickness is to sit under a tree.

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    A sure cure for seasickness is to sit under a tree. Spike Milligan
    Experimentation using branches as a matrix.


  5. Love rubber

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    Research on contextual lettering, or how to get a word to say more than it reads.
    The typeface made of blue rubber gloves is called Marigold, the black leatherish one is Mapplethorpe.


  6. As Thomas Fuller used to say…

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    A book that is shut is but a block.

    I thought of this experiment as a tautology: shut books that are therefore just blocks used to talk about the fact that shut books are just blocks.


  7. Mapa Connexion

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    Medium of the day: Scanner+ fully lined household rubber gloves.


  8. Ideographic Alphabet [sic]

    (and chair-reading)

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    Ferdinand de Saussure only acknowledged two forms of writing: Alphabetic (letter form and phonetic based) and ideographic (based on pictorial symbols).

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    This ideographico-alphabetic type is only to be used to talk about the very specific chair the letter form is based on.


  9. Love, love, love

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    Or how a hose, a dog, a toboggan and a concrete block put together can mean Love.


  10. I love BodoNY

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    The logo for the I Love New York advertising many campaigns is a rebus created by Milton Glaser consisting of the capital letter I, followed by a red heart symbol (♥), below which are the capital letters N and Y, set in a rounded slab serif typeface. The logo and advertising campaign have been used for decades to promote tourism in New York state — not merely New York City, as many believe.
    It is a famous pop-style icon that unabashedly promotes the metropolitan pride of New York State. In 1977, William S. Doyle, Deputy Commissioner of the New York State Department of Commerce hired advertising agency Wells Rich Greene to develop a marketing campaign for New York State. Doyle also recruited Milton Glaser, a productive graphic designer to work on the campaign, and he created the design based on Wells Rich Greene’s advertising campaign. Glaser expected the campaign to last only a couple months and did the work pro bono. However, the design became a major success and has continued to be sold for years.

    Giambattista Bodoni (1740-1813) was an Italian engraver, publisher, printer and typographer of high repute remembered for designing a typeface which is now called Bodoni.
    Giambattista Bodoni achieved an unprecedented level of technical refinement, allowing him to faithfully reproduce letterforms with very thin “hairlines”, standing in sharp contrast to the thicker lines constituting the main stems of the characters. His printing reflected an aesthetic of plain, unadorned style, combined with purity of materials.

    Oh, yes I do love Bodoni.