Amandine Alessandra: News & Projects / Portfolio

  1. January to May laid on a table

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    1. Preliminary research on form (Triangle))
    2. Research on form
    3. Research on colour
    4. Research on context 1 (Sporting Spirit)
    5. Research on final project


  2. The Sporting Spirit

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    Triad Badminton court

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    Triad Badminton court

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    Triad Football pitch

    In 1945, an Arsenal match against a Soviet football team called the Dynamos was organized in London with the naïve belief that it would warm up the frozen pre-cold war Anglo-Soviet relations.

    In an article published at the time titled The Sporting Spirit,
    George Orwell wrote about his disbelief when hearing “people saying that sport creates goodwill between the nations, and that if only the common peoples of the world could meet on another at football or cricket, they would have no inclination to meet on the battlefield”, and then add that “Nearly all the sports practised nowadays are competitive. You play to win, and the game has little meaning unless you do your utmost to win (…) At the international level sport is frankly mimic warfare (…) Serious sport
    has nothing to do with fair play. It is bound up with hatred, jealousy, boastfulness, disregard of all rules and sadistic pleasure in witnessing violence: in other words it is war minus the shooting.”

    My idea was to compare the binary tension between 2 (= 1 winner + 1 looser) and the tension existing between 3 elements, and to make that tension a triangle instead of a bi-polar line.
    A court or a pitch designed for 3 entities also engages questions of alliances and strategies: would 2 players spontaneously team up in order to win over a stronger third one? And then inverse the alliance system as the score evolves? Would the tension remain as a triangle shape, or should we then talk about a V shaped relationship among the players (2 against 1)?


  3. Like the back of my hand

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    “to know (something) like the back of one’s hand”

    1. (transitive, idiomatic) To be intimately knowledgable about something, especially a place.

    Littéralement « connaître quelque chose comme le dos de sa main ».

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    Explanation: Do you recognize this intriguing globular cluster of stars? It’s actually the constellation of city lights surrounding London, England, planet Earth, as recorded with a digital camera from the International Space Station. Taken in February 2003, north is toward the top and slightly left in this nighttime view. The encircling “London Orbital” highway by-pass, the M25, is easiest to pick out south of the city. Even farther south are the lights of Gatwick airport and just inside the western (left hand) stretch of the Orbital is Heathrow. The darkened Thames river estuary fans out to the city’s east. In particular, two small “dark nebulae” – Hyde Park and Regents Park – stand out slightly west of the densely packed lights at the city’s core.


  4. Mass & Void

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  5. Narrative: sequence & randomness

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  6. Motion: activity & passivity

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  7. Order: unity & fragmentation

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  8. Time & meter: 26 minutes 198 meter triangle

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  9. Rhythm: regularity & irregularity

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  10. Line & Plane

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