Amandine Alessandra: News & Projects / Portfolio

  1. In vino veritas

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    In vino veritas (wine reveals the truth) is a plain white tablecloth that only reveals its damask pattern
    as wine is spilled on it. (Perfect for clumsy guests!)

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    This is part of a research on ephemeral stencils, looking into “programming” a shape or word to appear, evolve and disappear according to changesin its environment. Traditionally, damasks were woven in a single colour, with a glossy warp-faced satin pattern against a duller ground, causing the thread to reflect the light differently according to the position of the observer. I liked the idea of a pattern that would only be revealed under certain circumstances, just as truth and secrets would.

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    The tannin can be fixated by washing the tablecloth in cold water with 1kg of salt instead of laundry powder, although this may cause the color to change accordingly to the wine used. (See below)

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    In vino veritas tableclothes will be shown and sold during the Milan Furniture Fair, in the Foodmarketo pop-up shop/gallery. FoodMarketo is a joint project by Apartamento magazine and DesignMarketo.
    Where: Milan, Via Masera in front of n.10
    at the Kaleidoscope space.
    When: 13-18 April 2010

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  2. Letterform for the Ephemeral

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    An everlasting choreography referencing the (real) passing of time, people standing as the Hours moving only once every 60 minutes, while the one acting as the tenths of Seconds executes a very fast routine in a continual move.
    This image is a screenshot of this work.

    In The Practice of Everyday Life, Michel de Certeau creates a relationship between the metropolis and its inhabitants on one side, and the practice of writing and speaking on the other side, and how they are “writing an urban text
    as they move through it”.

    A given message evolves in perpetual flux and its context is permanently shifting, regardless if its support is an advert or public signage.

    Who is its audience? Where is it read? What is the weather like? What is everyone talking about on that day?
    Are they in a hurry? Does it smell of hotdogs as they’re reading it?
    A static printed message cannot adapt to a changing situation; it therefore belongs to the platonic ideal world rather than the hic et nunc (here and now) of the real world.


  3. Wearable lettering

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    This is an experiment on wearable lettering.
    It started as a series of three day-glow and black tee-shirts, each with a slightly different pattern that becomes different highly visible letters when seen from a distance, providing that the wearer places his arms and body in a specific way.

    When wearing these tee shirts, a group of people can form a word, a sentence or a statement. Because a single person can mimic a whole set of letters, the message can change, from one movement to another.

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    The flexibility of this letterform being slightly jeopardized by the fact that one single tee shirt couldn’t be used to make every letter, I started to think the wearable typography as a bolero instead: a pair of day-glow sleeves attached together by a strip of fabric that could be worn across the front or the back of the wearer.

    This new pattern allowed the wearer to become any letter, number or punctuation mark in a small move.

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  4. Ephemeral stencils: Birdseeds

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    Amandine_Alessandra

    Confronting the notion of ephemeral stencils to the semantic field of tattoos. Tattoos understood as the contrary of temporary messages in both their form and their message, with words and promises such as Love, Forever, Always.
    Using the word Always for its double-meaning of repetition and eternity.
    Ephemeral stencil made with birdseeds.
    More here.