Amandine Alessandra: News & Projects / Portfolio

  1. Sofia Design Week: When life gives you bulgur, make lemonade

    bulgur_lemonade

    During the Sofia Design Week, DesignMarketo will present Lemonade For All, a new collection of specially commissioned products made by a selection of international designers. The new collection will be presented in their pop up shop/workshop, where they will be handing out freshly home-made lemonade to visitors.

    For this occasion, I’m giving a cooking workshop entitles When life gives you bulgur, make lemonade, a twisted interpretation of the popular saying about doing the best of what you have. This is happening on Wednesday 15 June, 2-5pm, so please do pop in if you are in Sofia!

    The workshops are free and opened to all. They are limited to about 10-15 people and booking by email is essential. Bookings are based on a first booked/first served basis. To register: info@designmarketo.com

    INFORMATION
    DesignMarketo
    5 Open Art Space
    1? Hristo Botev Blvd.
    1606 Sofia, Bulgaria
    (Next to “Pette Kiusheta”)
    Open everyday 10am to 7pm.

    More info, design, worskhops and lemonade here: http://designmarketo.com/events/sofia-design-week-2011/


  2. Clerkenwell Design Week 2011: Stop Motion Typography workshop

    amandine_alessandraTypographic performance at Liverpool Street Station (18:00:00 – 19:00:00)

    For Clerkenwell Design Week 2011 DesignMarketo is setting up at the Farmiloe Building on St John Street in collaboration with the Barbican Art Centre. I will be giving a (free) workshop based on stop motion and typography, using the iconic building space as a grid to produce a human typeface.
    Wednesday 25.05.11 from 2-4pm

    Also: do not miss Alexandre Bettler‘s workshop on mobile typography:
    Thursday 26.05.11 from 5-pm

    24-26 May 2011
    34, St John Street, London
    EC1M 4AY

    http://designmarketo.com/events/clerkenwell-design-week-2011/


  3. New collection: In Rainbow Veritas

    Amandine_Alessandra

    Cutlery Use Dev Org, tablecloth Amandine Alessandra during A Dinner with DesignMarketo at the Barbican Gallery.

    Amandine_Alessandra

    Amandine_Alessandra

    In Rainbow Veritas is a new edition of In vino Veritas, a plain white bistrot tablecloth that reveals its pattern as wine, blueberry juice, curry sauce or tea is spilled on it, diverting the attention away from an awkward situation, as an irregular pattern of flowers blossoms in the stain.
    The new collection was recently launched in London at the dinner hosted by DesignMarketo
    at the Barbican Gallery.

    A limited series, hand printed in East London by All Cats Are Grey and sold on DesignMarketo.


  4. Emerge

    amandine_alessandra_opening

    I was also part of the 2010 edition of the Emerge show during London Design Week.
    During the opening, guests were invited to pose as human letterforms/numbers
    and were given a polaroid of their mini-performance (instant typography deserves
    instant photography, doesn’t it?).


  5. Type should move

    Amandine_Alessandra_Poster

    “All is flux, nothing stays still, no man ever steps twice in the same river“, observed Heraclites.
    This intelligent (because human) letterform allows a message to change from an instant to another, in an attempt to reflect on the fleeting quality of the moment.
    It is flexible enough to keep the message relevant and up to date as its context changes, but also has the visual presence of a giant billboard.


  6. Letterform for the Ephemeral/Pirating

    Amandine_Alessandra_Abbey_Road

    As seen on webcam on http://www.abbeyroad.co.uk/visit/ on the 29/10/2009 between 14h07 and 14h37 GMT

    In this phase of the project, ephemeral typography is used to induce people to feel the weight of passing time,
    with its flow symbolically interrupted by halting the traffic.
    This typographic performance was only recorded by taking screenshots of the images transmitted by a public webcam (showing the iconic Abbey Road crossing) onto a computer.

    As this medium displays one “real-time” image every 4  seconds, a fraction of second seems to be extended
    for the length of time necessary for the image to be refreshed.
    Using a public webcam to display a message also considerably broadens its audience.


  7. Letterform for the Ephemeral

    Amandine_Alessandra_clock

    An everlasting choreography referencing the (real) passing of time, people standing as the Hours moving only once every 60 minutes, while the one acting as the tenths of Seconds executes a very fast routine in a continual move.
    This image is a screenshot of this work.

    In The Practice of Everyday Life, Michel de Certeau creates a relationship between the metropolis and its inhabitants on one side, and the practice of writing and speaking on the other side, and how they are “writing an urban text
    as they move through it”.

    A given message evolves in perpetual flux and its context is permanently shifting, regardless if its support is an advert or public signage.

    Who is its audience? Where is it read? What is the weather like? What is everyone talking about on that day?
    Are they in a hurry? Does it smell of hotdogs as they’re reading it?
    A static printed message cannot adapt to a changing situation; it therefore belongs to the platonic ideal world rather than the hic et nunc (here and now) of the real world.


  8. Referencing the passing of time

    Recently, a bomb-sprayed piece of graffiti on a wall, reading “Time doesn’t exist, clocks exist”, drew my attention to two layers coexisting in the perception of time. One refers to the flowing entity, while the other invokes the intellectual, man-made structure that we use to sequence events and place them in a chronology.
    The notion of time also opposes the mathematical abstraction calculating periods of time and the concrete mechanism of clocks counting its passage.

    This begs the question: is there something called Time, other than the counting activity? Isn’t the consciousness of time a typically human experience?

    Amandine_Alessandra_2

    The final experiment of this research took place in a busy train station during rush hour, in order to reflect the flow characteristic of the place. It involved eight people mimicking a digital clock in real time with their arms and shoulders. Standing in line side by side in the middle of the station, two of them acted as the hours units, two for the minutes, and another two for the seconds. The two other performers were acting as the colons separating each unit of time. The wearable letterform, with its specific flexibility, allowed the message (in this case Time) to change from one second to the other, following more or less accurately the ticking of the station’s clock.
    The numbers each of the performers enacted were enhanced by day-glow long-sleeved boleros, which besides making them visible, also echoed the yellow of the train schedule boards above them.
    Used in this specific context and by using people as a medium, this temporary letterform confronts the economic value of time (as in time is money) with the individual perception of it.

    Amandine-Alessandra

    As seen at Liverpool Street Station on the 23/10/2009 between 18:00:00 and 19:00:00

    The final outcome of this experiment is its recording, in the form of a set of photographs fixing the message in the time, space and audience (commuters in a rush) it was addressed to. The letterform was contextual at the actual moment it was mimicked. What is left is a trace of it, as the message displayed (the time the photograph was taken) will not be accurate anymore when looking at the photograph. What was achieved with this latest experiment of wearable type was a hic et nunc letterform, a letterform for the here and now, finding its raison d’être when used in real time.